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Planck Studios Links

Article | Damien Hirst and the Great Art Market Heist
Hirst is the world's richest artist and the Tate's big retrospective will mark the zenith of his power. But when his stock falls, how will an art world in thrall to big money respond?
Bookmarked 5 years, 6 months ago
Video | Questions No One Knows the Answers to
In the first of a new TED-Ed series designed to catalyze curiosity, TED Curator Chris Anderson shares his boyhood obsession with quirky questions that seem to have no answers.
Bookmarked 5 years, 6 months ago
Article | Two Ways To Think About Nothing
Robert Rauschenberg, Willem de Kooning and the concept of 'nothing'
Bookmarked 5 years, 6 months ago
Article | Jonah Lehrer on How to Be Creative
The image of the 'creative type' is a myth. Jonah Lehrer on why anyone can innovate—and why a hot shower, a cold beer or a trip to your colleague's desk might be the key to your next big idea.
Bookmarked 5 years, 6 months ago
Advanced Civilization is Indistinguishable from Nature
What does complex science mean for our relationship with nature? Are we separate from or intrinsically connected to the natural world? In Western cultures, nature is a cosmological, primal ordering force and a terrestrial condition that exists in the absence of human beings. Both meanings are freely implied in everyday conversation. We distinguish ourselves from the natural world by manipulating our environment through technology. In What Technology Wants, Kevin Kelly proposes that technology behaves as a form of meta-nature, which has greater potential for cultural change than the evolutionary powers of the organic world alone.
Bookmarked 5 years, 6 months ago
Video | Time-lapse footage of the Earth as seen from the ISS
Many wonders are visible when flying over the Earth at night. A compilation of such visual spectacles was captured recently from the International Space Station (ISS) and set to rousing music. Passing below are white clouds, orange city lights, lightning flashes in thunderstorms, and dark blue seas. On the horizon is the golden haze of Earth's thin atmosphere, frequently decorated by dancing auroras as the video progresses. The green parts of auroras typically remain below the space station, but the station flies right through the red and purple auroral peaks. Solar panels of the ISS are seen around the frame edges. The ominous wave of approaching brightness at the end of each sequence is just the dawn of the sunlit half of Earth, a dawn that occurs every 90 minutes.
Bookmarked 5 years, 6 months ago
Video | Interactive Animation of Van Gogh's 'Starry Night'
A try to visualize the flow of the famous painting "Starry Night" of Vincent Van Gogh. The user can interact with the animation. Also, the sound responds to the flow. Made with openframeworks.
Bookmarked 5 years, 7 months ago
Video | HOW ART WORKS?
A serious movie about problems and solutions.
Bookmarked 5 years, 7 months ago
The Art Institute of Chicago: Free Weekdays 1/2/12 - 2/20/12
Free Winter Weekdays - Admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every weekday, January 2–February 10, 2012.
Bookmarked 5 years, 8 months ago
Video | WNYC Street Shots: Bruce Gilden
Hunting for characters on the Streets of New York City with Magnum Photographer Bruce Gilden.
Bookmarked 5 years, 8 months ago
Article | Autofocus and the importance of 'defocusing'
We take it for granted, but the human ability to focus instantly on particular objects in our field of vision, near or far, is a remarkable skill. As camera manufacturers have learned, it is not easy to replicate artificially. Even the most advanced digital cameras use autofocus mechanisms that are far from perfect. But now two US scientists have developed a simple algorithm that looks set to revolutionise the way autofocus works, allowing for greater speed and accuracy in digital photography.
Bookmarked 5 years, 8 months ago
Kodak is at death’s door; Fujifilm, its old rival, is thriving. Why?
LENIN is said to have sneered that a capitalist will sell you the rope to hang him. The quote may be spurious, but it contains a grain of truth. Capitalists quite often invent the technology that destroys their own business. Eastman Kodak is a picture-perfect example. It built one of the first digital cameras in 1975. That technology, followed by the development of smartphones that double as cameras, has battered Kodak’s old film- and camera-making business almost to death. Strange to recall, Kodak was the Google of its day. Founded in 1880, it was known for its pioneering technology and innovative marketing. “You press the button, we do the rest,” was its slogan in 1888. By 1976 Kodak accounted for 90% of film and 85% of camera sales in America. Until the 1990s it was regularly rated one of the world’s five most valuable brands.
Bookmarked 5 years, 8 months ago
Article | The Biology of Right and Wrong
Joshua Greene studies the scientific basis for moral decision-making. He likens the moral brain to a camera that comes with manufactured presets, such as “portrait” or “landscape,” along with a manual mode that requires photographers to make adjustments on their own. Emotional responses, which are influenced by humans’ biological makeup and social experiences, are like the presets: fast and efficient, but also mindless and inflexible. Rationality is like manual mode: adaptable to all kinds of unique scenarios, but time-consuming and cumbersome.
Bookmarked 5 years, 8 months ago
Sculpture | Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee
For the better part of three decades multidisciplinary artist Guy Laramee has worked as a stage writer, director, composer, a fabricator of musical instruments, a singer, sculptor, painter and writer. Among his sculptural works are two incredible series of carved book landscapes and structures entitled Biblios and The Great Wall, where the dense pages of old books are excavated to reveal serene mountains, plateaus, and ancient structures.
Bookmarked 5 years, 9 months ago
Concept | Digital Tattoo Interface
Her cell phone is ringing, but the display is turned off. She lightly pushes a small dot on the skin on her left forearm to suddenly reveal a two by four inch tattoo with the image of the cell phone's digital display, directly in the skin of her arm. She answers the call by pushing a tattooed button on her arm. While she's talking, the tattoo comes to life as a digital video of the caller. When she finishes, the tattoo disappears.
Bookmarked 5 years, 9 months ago